STLR

STLR Link Roundup – February 5, 2010

This week on the STLR radar: Freedom to Tinker conducts a “census” of files shared through BitTorrent, finding 99% of them to infringe copyright. From Business Week: a Pittsburgh couple is suing Google for trespass because Google posted pictures of their residence, including their pool and driveway. Italy will hold YouTube liable for uploads that [...]

Can Microsoft Stop the TiVo Litigation Juggernaut?

Microsoft filed a patent infringement lawsuit against TiVo on January 19, 2010.  What does this filing mean for TiVo and its meteoric litigation campaign? As Core Business Fades, TiVo is Turning to IP Licensing People love their DVRs.  More specifically, they love their TiVo DVRs.  TiVo was one of the first DVR providers (RIP Replay [...]

STLR Link Roundup – January 29, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Ephemerallaw assess the chances of Microsoft being sued for the Internet Explorer 6 vulnerability involved in the hacks recently suffered by Google, Adobe and other major companies. Billboard.biz reports that search engine Baidu, Google’s arch-rival in China, has won a piracy case brought by the International Federation of the [...]

STLR Link Roundup – January 22, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: More on Google and China: U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemned countries that use cyberattacks, reports the New York Times. Meanwhile, from the Wall Street Journal, Google affirmed its commitment both to remaining in China and to ceasing censorship of its search results. The company Legal River has [...]

STLR Link Roundup – January 15, 2010

Here’s the latest on the STLR radar: Twitter is a source of evidence for a murder charge, reports the New York Daily News.  But could those tweets be copyrighted?  Law.com’s Law Technology News weighs in. The Electronic Frontier Foundation provides a good, link-heavy analysis of the unanswered questions surrounding Google’s decision to stop censoring their [...]

STLR Link Roundup – January 8, 2010

Here’s the latest on the STLR radar: Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker in San Francisco decided to allow showing the trial challenging California’s Proposition 8 on YouTube, reports the San Francisco Chronicle.  The Wall Street Journal Law Blog questions whether that’s a good thing. Patent Librarian notes that Wikipedia citations in patent applications are [...]

STLR Link Roundup – January 1, 2010

Happy New Year!  We bring you the last links from the second half of December 2009 on the first day of 2010. Clever or illegal?  How online retailer Amazon escapes paying sales tax (and saves you from it as well), from Gizmodo. South Korea pardons former chairman of Samsung… a second time.  From the Wall [...]

STLR Link Roundup – December 18, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: The New York Times discusses the increasingly complex battle over e-book publishing rights. True/Slant reports on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s glitch with his social network’s new privacy settings, and asks whether the changes might violate FTC regulations. Misbehaving in the jury box: jurors researching on Wikipedia led to an [...]

STLR Link Roundup – December 11, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Judges and Facebook – Is it ok to be FB friends with lawyers?  The Florida Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says no, reports the New York Times. Michael Arrington and Crunchpad sues JooJoo for the joint tablet venture that so publicly went wrong, says Gizmodo. The Environmental Protection Agency announces [...]

STLR Link Roundup – December 4, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Patent Docs reviews Senator Patrick Leahy’s proposals for patent reform. Third Circuit gives “Spam filter ate my filing notice” excuse a second chance, from the Technology & Marketing Blog. EFF sues to find out how the government spies on us using social networks; Indiana University students makes a Freedom [...]